Skip to main content

About your Search

20130121
20130129
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9
that don't work? that is 60% of what they want to take additional lay out of the pentagon. where does the leadership say we will stop? to have a special subcommittee with the bad actors and we demand those people get fired but none of that happens. you could not perform on a contract and do it with impunity because members of congress are basically not willing or inexperienced to know you should hold people accountable whether a federal employee but that is one example just this week. >> host: what was the business you built? >> guest: my father started of machinery manufacturing business for our farming business. i had a different lens division in southern virginia 1969 through 2,008. >> host: does still exist? >> it has been sold portions of it exist. >> we're here is the author of radical chapters the kevlar bookstore was open in 1950 fined one negative a 1955. who was roy? >> guest: most influential peace activist of his generation, he helped found the first listener's sponsored radio station in the country, he helped to lead the war resisters league and found the first free unive
pentagon official. in july 2001 he assumed the duties of military assistant to secretary rumsfeld and work daily with the secretary for the next five and a half years. upon retirement from the army continued at the pentagon as deputy assistant secretary of defense homeland defense and american security affairs. please join me in welcoming steve. [applause] >> let me add my welcome to all of you. i think we're going to have a real treat this morning. as john mentioned, i am a special forces officer by profession. so this area is near and dear to my heart. this is kind of what we do or did. it'll let me do it anymore. [laughter] i mentioned to max when he came in a little historical artifact in that when i was a cadet at west point i bought a book that had just been published. a two volume set. it was called war in the shadows , the guerrilla in history by robert aspirate. that book from 1975 until now really has been the sort of a benchmark for this kind of historical review of this subject area. that is a long time for a book tour keep that sort of position. well, with apologies, i think h
of the pentagon and that's governmentwide. why would we do that? were going to have a special senate committee to look at this, oversight, look at bad actors in government and demand the people get fired in the company is not performing pay the money back. none of that happens. so you can defraud the federal government. you can do it with impunity and that's because members of congress are basically not willing or inexperienced to not know you want to hold people accountable for what they say they're going to do. whether it's a federal employee, procurement employee for the company provided. that's just one example that happened this week. >> host: what is the business started? >> guest: my father was in the business and i started a plastic lens class lines in intraocular lines division of that and i did that in southern virginia. at the tip here for 10 years. >> host: does that company still exists? >> guest: it was sold. portions still exist. >> up next, ricardo cortes with "a secret history of coffee, coca and cola." >> and now, ricardo cortes attacks that attempt superheavy of coffee and c
. this is the great ironny. from the pentagon point of view, women are banned from ground combat. on the ground, women have been fighting in combat in iraq and afghanistan for ten years. >> host: was there a typical experience for women in iraq and afghanistan, for american soldiers? >> guest: um, it's hard to say "typical" because it really did vary depending on the year they were serving, where they were serving and who they were serving with. um, but the stories i did hear were the most common story i heard were ones of isolation. because, as i said, one in ten troops are women, but they don't necessarily get deployed together. so many women serve with a very small number of other women, vastly outnumbered by men, sometimes even alone. i've talked to women who were the only one serving with 60 men. the isolation of serving like that can lead to a lot of problems. from constant harassment and loneliness to sexual assault and rape. and i did hear a great deal more of those stories than i expected when i started my research. gls and that seems to be a common theme in "the lonely soldier," harassment,
's 60% of what they want to take additionally out of the pentagon. and that's government wide. so why would we do that? where's the leadership in the congress to say we're going to get this stopped? we're going to have a special subcommittee look at this, oversight it, look at the bad actors, look at the bad actors in government, and we're going to napped -- to demand the people who make those decisions get fired and the companies who are not performing pay the money back. none of that happens. so you can defraud the federal government, you cannot perform on a contract, and you can do it with impunity. and that's because members of congress are basically not willing or inexperienced to not know that you ought to be able to hold people accountable for what they say they're going to do. whether it's a federal employee, a procurement employee or the company that's providing that. and that's just one example that happened this week. >> host: senator coburn, what was the business you built before you went to medical school? >> guest: my father had started a machinery manufacturing business
they last passed a budget. they could have taken 179 trips to the moon or built three pentagons. today it looks like that's all about to change. it's nice to see that after years of playing budget peekaboo, senate democrats are finally ready to take up their most basic of responsibilities, and only a few weeks after the chairwoman of the budget committee indicated they might skip it for the fourth year in a row, there is an indication now that the majority is committed to passing a budget. what's unfortunate is that it's required so much pressure for them to do so. it's in stark contrast to the house of representatives who have taken their duties very seriously. over there, committee hearings have been held, budget resolutions have been marked up, amendments have been considered. more importantly, the house has passed serious budgets annually, as the law requires. they have laid out their priorities for the public to see their plans to control spending could save our most important social programs from collapse. to reform an outdated and anticompetitive tax code, and to streamline gove
uniquely what the pentagon doesn't, or the nro doesn't, over the civilian space. and that is a reason maybe not well enough understood why homeland has to be an independent player, yet many in the private sector, some of the business interests have been saying that homeland does not have the competence to do this job well. do you agree with that? >> no. [laughter] spent i think that's what they call -- that's a leading question. >> one of the things we deal with all the time at dhs is perception doesn't match reali reality. and so perception is of how things work, you know, five years ago, seven years ago and the like. perception needs to catch up with reality. because point of fact, the department has moved light-years ahead in terms of its cyber capabilities come and we continue to move in that direction. president obama has continued to ask congress for the resources that we need in order to do that. so when we talk about the interaction with the private pre sector, which we did in a number of other areas already, what we are talking about linking together the private sector that that pa
additional the of the pentagon and that is government-wide. so why would we do that? where is the leadership in the congress that we are going to get this stopped? we have a special subcommittee to look at this, oversight, look at the bad actors, look at the bad actors in government coming and we are going to demand the people that make those decisions get fired and the countries that are not performing get paid back. none of that happens. so you can and defraud the federal government coming you can outperform on a contract and you can do it with impunity and that's because members of congress are basically not willing or are inexperienced to not know that you ought to be able to hold people accountable for what they say they are going to do. whether it is a federal employee, a procurement employees or the company that's providing it and that is flexible that happened this week my father started a business for the products and i started a plastic lens and interocular lenses division of that and i did that actually in southern virginia. i lived up here for ten years from the summer of '69 to
to the white house situation room, the national military command center the pentagon and cia op center. having worked as a watch center in the information that has a threat to the safety of citizens overseas is passed through other agencies mentioned above. if it is of significant message concerning american interest is received, it is the watch officers, to ensure that these other agencies are informed. he goes on there are many other questions that need to be answered and i would present these questions on his behalf. first and foremost was going on at the office of the department in washington while our consulate was under attack for seven hours? >> well, we can certainly give you greater detail, but the center as you have described, you know it is the place communications goes in and out. they were receiving calls, they were deeply engaged in trying to help us. they don't reach out on their own but to help us acquire information so that we can respond in real time. >> in seven hours, goodness gracious there should have the response. why did labeling the attack as terrorism immediately know
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)